Residues of salicylic acid and its metabolites in hen plasma, tissues and eggs as a result of animal treatment and consumption of naturally occurring salicylates

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Uploaded date: December 24, 2023

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Study looks at salicylate levels in eggs, liver, and muscle meat after chickens are given salicylates in their drinking water over the course of seven days. Levels were tested intermittently over 72 hours. The exposure of hens to the salicylates at feed additive levels and to naturally occurring salicylates results in low residue concentrations and fast depletion of salicylic acid. The eggs do not pose any risk to consumers sensitive to salicylates.

Source Information

Publication date: 2020

Source Type: Original research article

CSE Citation: Protasiuk, E., & Olejnik, M. (2020). Residues of salicylic acid and its metabolites in hen plasma, tissues and eggs as a result of animal treatment and consumption of naturally occurring salicylates. Food additives & contaminants. Part A, Chemistry, analysis, control, exposure & risk assessment, 37(6), 946–954. https://doi.org/10.1080/19440049.2020.1744740.
Author Abstract:

Salicylates are among the most known anti-inflammatory drugs, used both in human and veterinary medicine. They also occur naturally in plants. Residues of salicylic acid in tissues and eggs may occur after drug administration or exposure of animals to feed material with high salicylate content. An animal study was performed on laying hens. The birds received sodium salicylate or acetylsalicylic acid (10 mg/kg b.w.) for 7 days or were given corn containing 1.18 mg/kg of salicylic acid. Samples of liver, muscle and plasma were collected at 0, 4, 8, 24 and 72 h after treatment; eggs were collected daily for 14 days. Salicylic acid and its metabolites: gentisic acid, salicyluric acid and gentisuric acid were determined using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. In both liver and muscle, the residues after administration of sodium salicylate were initially higher than for acetylsalicylic acid but they depleted at the same time. The deposition and depletion profile of salicylic acid in eggs was similar for groups receiving both drugs; the plateau level reached 248 ± 61.5 μg/kg and 275 ± 82.1 μg/kg. The concentration of salicylic acid in tissues and eggs of animals receiving salicylic acid was low. Gentisic acid was found in individual samples of liver, muscle and eggs from all treated groups. The exposure of hens to the salicylates at feed additive levels and to naturally occurring salicylates results in low residue concentrations and fast depletion of salicylic acid. The eggs do not pose any risk to consumers sensitive to salicylates.

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