Foods Great for Making Snacks

Please check on these foods' levels on the food list, as they'll provide a little more context why they're listed here. For example, bananas vary widely - including up into the high range, but are generally well tolerated, especially when ripe. So please do your research and talk with your dietician/nutritionist first on which foods you should work with!

Dairy

  • Cottage cheese
  • Unflavored yogurt
  • Cream cheese
  • Swiss cheese
  • Monterrey Jack cheese
  • Harvarti
  • Provolone
  • Mozarella
  • Cheese sticks - string cheese
  • Brie
  • White cheddar cheese
  • Goat cheese (unflavored)
  • Sour cream
  • Whisps - parmesan chips

Wheat Products

  • Crackers
  • Weet-bix
  • Granola - homemade with sal safe ingredients
  • Special K cereal
  • Melba/petite toasts
  • Baguettes, slided
  • Sourdough
  • Pita chips
  • Clean tortilla
  • Pretzels (small and crunchy)
  • Soft pretzels
  • Bagel (plain or whole wheat)

Gluten-Free Options

  • Toasted rice cakes
  • GF Weet-bix
  • Special K Cereal (brown rice)
  • GF Pita chips
  • GF tortilla
  • Sorghum popable pop"corn"
  • GF Bagel 

Beans/Legumes

  • Toasted soy nuts (edamame - the green version - is moderate)
  • Toasted garbanzo beans
  • Canned, soaked, or cooked garbanzo beans for making hummus
  • White bean Beanitos chips
  • Black bean Beanitos chips
  • Wowbutter/Soy butter

Nuts and Seeds

Try these in small amounts (less than 2 Tablespoons per day) to see how you many react.

  • Nut/seed butters: cashew, pecan, hazelnut, sunflower seed
  • Cashews (raw or roasted is fine)
  • Pecans
  • Hazelnuts
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Consider making your own nutella: hazelnut and chocolate spread

Fruits

  • Peeled pears
  • Canned pears (homemade or in syrup)
  • Golden Delicious apples, peeled
  • Pink Lady apples, peeled, have also tested fairly low
  • Bananas - choose very ripe ones, and these can vary in sals
  • Plantain chips - I've done ok with these. I think the Trader Joes brand uses sunflower oil.

Vegetables

  • Celery sticks
  • Iceberg lettuce for wraps

Meats, Eggs, and Fish

  • Clean turkey lunch meat
  • Clean ham
  • Clean Canadian Bacon
  • Canned Salmon or Tuna
  • Cold shrimp
  • Clean bacon - precook
  • Precooked chicken
  • Pancetta and Prosciutto
  • Boiled eggs

Baking

  • Carob
  • Chocolate chips

 

 

Snack Ideas

This list is growing - the goal is to get to 100 - help us out by sending us your snacks.https://low-sal-life.com/about#contact

  1. Celery sticks with Salmon Cream Dip
  2. Crackers with Salmon Cream Dip
  3. Toast with Salmon Cream Dip
  4. Lettuce wraps with Salmon Cream Dip
  5. Yogurt with pears or pear jam
  6. Yogurt with homemade granola
  7. Yogurt with Weet-bix
  8. Yogurt with Special K cereal
  9. Cottage cheese with homemade pear jam
  10. Celery sticks and cream cheese
  11. Celery sticks and Wowbutter or nut butter
  12. Apples with hard white cheeses
  13. Apple with soft cheese (goat cheese, brie)
  14. Beanitos (bean) chips with cheese melted on top
  15. Chips/crisps with sour cream
  16. Hummus with celery
  17. Hummus with bean chips
  18. Hummus with crackers
  19. Hummus with bread - Melba/petite toasts/ toasted baguette slices
  20. Hummus with pita chips
  21. Prosciutto with mozarella wrap
  22. Pancetta with cheese and pear jam
  23. Nut mix with chocolate
  24. Lettuce wraps - cheese
  25. Lettuce wraps - lunch meat with cheese
  26. Boiled eggs
  27. Handful of roasted chickpeas or roasted soy nuts
  28. Lettuce wraps - ham, turkey or lunch meat with cheese
  29. Lettuce warps - cold chicken, green onions, and sour cream, chickpeans, beans or mung bean sprouts
  30. Lettuce wrap, canned tuna or salad, sour cream
  31. Shrimp lettuce wrap
  32. Tortilla wraps - lunch meat and cheese
  33. Popable sorghum - serve with butter and salt
  34. Nut/soy butter and jelly sandwich (use homemade pear jam)
  35. Small pretzels served with cubed white cheddar
  36. Large pretzels with homemade dippable cheese sauce (I'll find a recipe soon to post, after testing)
  37. Keto cheese-waffle: chaffle, serve with butter
  38. Parmesan chips with cured meat (bacon or canadian bacon)
  39. Peeled apple slides (rounds), topped with nut or soy butter topped with granola.
  40. Homemade granola bars
  41. Bananas served with nut/soy butter
  42. Bananas served with nut/soy butter - rolled in granola or served with some chocolate
  43. Bagel with cream cheese
  44. Brie and petite toast (or sliced baquette) with sliced apples or pear

 

Grab and Go - while you're out and travelling

  1. Potato chips made with sal-safe oils. Peeled potatoes are best
  2. Mozarella sticks
  3. Boiled eggs
  4. Decaf coffee with heavy cream (keeps me full for awhile)
  5. Salmon and rice sushi/sashimi box (don't eat the wasabi and ginger)
  6. Prosciutto with mozarella wrap

 

 

 

 

 

 

Websites and Blogs List

There are so many great little websites dedicated to salicylate intolerance, I wanted to showcase them here. Some of them may not have been updated recently and I have not reviewed every post, I've included them because there have been interesting and useful articles within them. Again, I recommend you do your own research and try any suggestions carefully. Please contact me if you have a website to post.

This is, by no means, anything fancy. It will help you get an idea of how many mg of salicylates you're getting per serving.

Download or open the excel sheet. Weigh your item. Find your approximate dose.

I will add to this over time, for example, include liquids, or incorporate ounces. This is what I have so far, so I thought I'd share.

Please remember that salicylates in foods, especially produce, can swing wildly.

Books I've Read and Recommend

The Salicylate Handbook: Your Guide to Understanding Salicylate Sensitivity by Sharla Race

This new, revised, edition of The Salicylate Handbook provides an excellent guide to understanding salicylate sensitivity.

Based on the author's own experience and using all the currently available research, it is the most comprehensive guide to salicylate sensitivity you will find. It is supportive, full of common sense, well researched, and even has a touch of humour.

If you need to know about all the ways in which a salicylate sensitivity can affect your health, and life, then you need this handbook.

Salicylate Intolerance and The Healthier I Ate The Sicker I Got (Revised 2nd Edition) by Joan Tozzi Ablahani

This book is about Salicylate Intolerance, an allergy to aspirin and many healthy foods that certain people can't metabolize. Foods responsible for migraines, arthritis, asthma, ADHD, dry eyes, canker sores, burning chapped lips,chronic fatigue, rashes and Fibromyalgia. This Intolerance is still unrecognized and undiagnosed by most Medical Doctors.

Read about one women's life of unnecessary suffering and her quest to research and write a book to prevent other people from suffering. Two days after avoiding foods like fruit, certain vegetables, olive oil, tomato sauce, tea and wine all of her symptoms disappeared. Yours can too. You are not crazy. You are not a hypochondriac. And you are not alone.

The Great Cholesterol Myth Now Includes 100 Recipes for Preventing and Reversing Heart Disease: Why Lowering Your Cholesterol Won't Prevent Heart Disease-and the Statin-Free Plan that Will by Jonny Bowden, Stephen Sinatra, and Deirdre Rawlings

In The Great Cholesterol Myth Now Includes 100 Recipes for Preventing and Reversing Heart Disease, nutrition and health experts lay out detailed plans and recipes to help you prevent and reverse heart disease.

The Eczema Diet: Discover How to Stop and Prevent The Itch of Eczema Through Diet and Nutrition by Karen Fischer

Twenty per cent of people in the developed world have eczema -- the incident rate among babies and children is on the rise.

The research shows that eczema sufferers spend up to $2000 on eczema treatments each year and nearly 40 percent spend more than 10 minutes each day applying topical treatments. And yet the number of people with eczema is rising and has tripled in recent years.

While it's perfectly fine to use modern medicines to help you or your child gain temporary relief, you need to explore and ultimately follow a long term solution. This solution involves making environmental and dietary changes. This outstanding program offers solutions and advice that can be tailored to suit individual needs -- whether it be a baby, child or adult -- ultimately you'll be able to manage and mend the eczema.

RPAH Elimination Diet Handbook - 2019 - new version

The Diagnostic Elimination Diet Handbook Volume 1 has been released in 2019 and is an updated edition of the "RPAH Elimination Diet Handbook with food & shopping guide". This handbook is intended to be used for the investigation and management of people with suspected food intolerance.

This handbook is available for interested Accredited Practising Dietitians and medical practitioners to purchase for their patients. It is also available to members of the public.

Purchase from Australia: https://www.slhd.nsw.gov.au/rpa/allergy/resources/foodintol/handbook.html
Includes bulk and international orders, note prices are in AUD.

RPAH Friendly Food: The essential guide to managing common food allergies and intolerances

Friendly Food is a recipe book and a complete guide to avoiding allergies, additives and problem chemicals. It is available to all members of the general public for $35 (plus postage) and can be purchased here from the Allergy Unit, or from most major bookstores and department stores throughout Australia.
(Murdoch Books® ISBN 978-1760524593)


Free pdf of book: https://www.slhd.nsw.gov.au/rpa/allergy/resources/foodintol/friendlyfood.html

Books I'd Read in the Future

The Food Intolerance Handbook: Your Guide to Understanding Food Intolerance, Food Sensitivities, Food Chemicals, and Food Allergies by Sharla Race

A 'healthy' diet is only healthy if it works for you, and you are unique.

Eating the wrong diet for you can lead to physical and mental problems, affect your appearance, alter your behaviour and limit your life. Changing your diet can truly change your life.

The Food Intolerance Handbook guides you gently through understanding the ways in which food intolerance can make you ill. Detailed information, distilled from volumes of research, on individual foods and food chemicals ensures this book is a comprehensive handbook of food intolerance and food allergy.
Previously published as "Change Your Diet and Change Your Life."

Free To Eat: A practical guide to reducing the symptoms of histamine, sulphur, glutamate and salicylate sensitivity by Janine Lattimore

This book is full of practical information that shows sufferers of histamine, glutamate, sulphur and salicylate sensitivity how to become ‘Free to Eat”. It is the basic ‘how to manage your chemical intolerances’ guide that I wish someone had handed me when I was first diagnosed and which I couldn't find anywhere else" says author Janine Lattimore. It’s a practical guide for adults and parents of children who suffer from chemical intolerances such as salicylate, histamine, sulphur and glutamate sensitivity. Free To Eat covers all aspects of day to day living.

This book will be an informative handbook for those who follow a Failsafe or Feingold diet or for anyone with multiple chemical sensitivity or an intolerance to salicylates, amines, sulphur or glutamates.
 

Do you have Candida or Salicylate intolerance? by Karen Reynolds

This book is full of practical information that shows sufferers of histamine, glutamate, sulphur and salicylate sensitivity how to become ‘Free to Eat”. It is the basic ‘how to manage your chemical intolerances’ guide that I wish someone had handed me when I was first diagnosed and which I couldn't find anywhere else" says author Janine Lattimore. It’s a practical guide for adults and parents of children who suffer from chemical intolerances such as salicylate, histamine, sulphur and glutamate sensitivity. Free To Eat covers all aspects of day to day living.

This book will be an informative handbook for those who follow a Failsafe or Feingold diet or for anyone with multiple chemical sensitivity or an intolerance to salicylates, amines, sulphur or glutamates.
 

Other great articles

Eating toward immortality: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/02/eating-toward-immortality/515658/
Knowing a thing means you don’t need to believe in it. Whatever can be known, or proven by logic or evidence, doesn’t need to be taken on faith. Certain details of nutrition and the physiology of eating are known and knowable: the fact that humans require certain nutrients; the fact that our bodies convert food into energy and then into new flesh (and back to energy again when needed). But there are bigger questions that don’t have definitive answers, like what is the best diet for all people? For me?...