Blue Cheese Wedge Salad

Prep time: 20m

Cook time:

Yield: 4 servings

Last Updated on December 10, 2023

Delicious and full of flavor, and actually a filling salad! Pair this with fresh sliced pears (especially if you miss the tomatoes) and a steak. Includes the recipe for the dressing.

Ingredients

Dressing

  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup blue cheese crumbles
  • 2 Tbsp buttermilk, kefir, milk or cream
  • 1/4 tsp rice vinegar - taste as you go! (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp salt to taste

Salad

  • 1 iceberg lettuce head, cut into wedges
  • 1/2 cup toated hazelnuts
  • 4 slices bacon, cooked and chopped
  • 1/2 cup blue cheese crumbles for garnish
  • 1 pear, sliced, optional

Directions

  • Prepare bacon crumbles - I prefer to bake in the oven at 350F for about 20-25 minutes. Brush water on top of slices to prevent curling. Then chop up after cooled.
  • Toast/roast nuts, I prefer hazelnuts, but pecans or cashews may also be tolerated. I toast for about 15 minutes at 350F. Lightly crush after they have cooled.
  • Wash and drain lettuce. Cut into halves or quarters. If serving smaller children, maybe chop the lettuce so it's easier to eat.
  • Make dressing: combine sour cream, blue cheese, and buttermilk in a bowl, stirring until a drippy/pour-able state. Taste and add rice vinegar as needed for tang, and salt as desired.
  • Assemble salad: place lettuce wedge on plate (cut side facing up), drizzle/spread the dressing around covering about 40% of the wedge. Top with bacon, hazelnuts, blue cheese crumbles. Sliced pears adds some acidity and brightness and has a similar texture to tomatoes making it a nice substitute.
  • Serve with a fork and knife.

Additional Notes

  • Lemon juice has tested high in salicylates, lime has never been tested. Some people can tolerate it in small amounts making it a nice addition for acidity over rice vinegar. Barley malt vinegar can be used, and if you don't like vinegar, a little ascorbic acid might work well too for some tang.
  • Pecans and hazelnuts have been tested once in 1985 as low in salicylates. RPAH lists them as high, which also includes their amine levels - pecans are high in amines, and hazelnuts are moderate. Many low-sal folks can tolerate them just fine in small amounts.
  • Make sure to find a clean bacon without honey, pepper, or other high-salicylate items. Nitrates are not salicylates, but some chemically-sensitive individuals may not tolerate nitrates well.

Diet Type(s)

Negligible or Low Salicylate
Gluten-Free
Keto/Low Carb
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